Royersford, PA Concrete Contractors

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2. Doug The Handyman

(2)

Philadelphia, PA 19111

(215) 292-1667

Doug and his assistant did a wonderful job on backsplash in my kitchen. The only word I could say is "Wow"!! It looks beautiful. They were on time …

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21. Got Problems? Get Solutions.

(9)

Emmaus, PA 18049

(610) 232-7619

Highly Recommend! In my Bucks county home, they relocated my laundry room from the main floor into the basement. They took care of the plumbing, e…

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27. Daley Stone & Concrete

(2)

Royersford, PA 19468

(484) 429-1858

BEWARE! Let me preface this by stating I am not disgruntled, an angry person nor do I typically write reviews. Nor am I anywhere near being anal ret…

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28. River Front Construction Inc

462 Main StRoyersford, PA 19468

(610) 948-4181
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29. Daley Stone & Concrete

106 N 6th AveRoyersford, PA 19468

(484) 429-1858
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Helpful Reviews 
Daley Stone & Concrete
Dan B. rated

BEWARE! Let me preface this by stating I am not disgruntled, an angry person nor do I typically write reviews. Nor am I anywhere near being anal retentive. However, I would be remiss if I did not provide information for my fellow consumer regarding the quality, character, and general overall experience with this contractor. I will STRONGLY caution you NOT to consider this contractor. Please know this review is honest and fair. I only wish I could include photos. I see in other reviews, the owner responded with counterpoints. Any retort from the contractor for this review should be dismissed as rubbish—trust me.1.Poor craftsmanship, no care for attention to detail, took money, tucked tail and ran, no response to concerns—BEWARE!!!!!!2.Awful high labor and material cost for sheet replacement – separate from quote (we knew there would be additional cost though.3.Seriously—all fours main windows were not reset correctly –1/4 to ½ gaps in sill, nails and insulation sticking through jambs on inside of house, actual breakage in the plastic framing, and three of the four are no longer functioning properly—seriously!4.Though we were told we could choose any stone veneer offered, later in the game owner called me to tell me that the stone we picked would cost more because it still had to be cut—no way. Miraculously, they had enough in stock. Good news, there will be no additional cost. Shady! 5.After stone install, windows are covered with concrete residue that will not come off with pressure washer—will have to scrape each window myself though guaranteed cleanup after job6.About ½ way up, I noticed the sample stone is not what appeared to be installed. Was told it was the way they were cut (veneers) by Rolling Rock. It was all one color with no variation (gray, gray gray). Our sample had tans, rusts and some mauve as well. No virgin stone faces being set. Quality control issue. Owner responded quickly to complaint, came out early in the AM, negotiated fix. Initial fix—though their QC issue—would, what do you know, cost more money. I kept hearing about labor costs and material costs. Look, bottom line, the owner did not have proper oversight of QC and let a bland looking, not representative of the agreed upon sample be installed on our home. I mean come on, it just didn’t even look good. He admitted that as we stood there. I’m not a jerk but this is the front of our home and VERY expensive! Since we were having a matching mailbox installed as well, I negotiated a deal on that instead and received a guarantee he would ensure variations would be integrated.7.A number of the stones were poorly cut and installed. No kidding throughout the first 8-10 feet of stone there were MANY areas where small rock size stone chips (scraps) were wedged into misshapen gaps. It was pathetic. Complained and had some fixed but some still remained8.This was stack stone which generally runs parallel to the ground. Nope, not in one of the large sections near the second story window. Looked like and archway—had to fix. Did so to a reasonable attempt but not fully.9.Shutters installed upside down, twisted and crooked 10.Stupid me, gave final payment with agreement from owner about addressing some remaining punch list items when he returned to complete mailbox. Told me he had to order more corners for mailbox and that they needed time to be ordered, cut and picked up. 11.After not hearing from owner for over a week past the initial completion date for mailbox, I reached out via email. Got a response that they would be there immediately following Easter 2017 and that the delay was due to weather. Okay. Almost two weeks past that time has now gone and owner is not responding to my emails. By the way, called Rolling Rock and they have had the corners in stock! Again, shady!12.There’s more, but you get the point. If you hire this guy, you are NOT thinking it through!13.BEWARE, BEWARE, BEWARE!

Daley Stone & Concrete
Tony F. rated

Buyer beware. Unethical contractor. Tried to charge us for work never performed and then abandoned the job when he was caught. Very poor craftsmanship. Stone was literally falling off the house after installation, and then he had the audacity to claim we tried to sabotage his work. You won’t get what you paid for, and you will likely need to hire another mason to complete his shoddy work.

Did You Know?

A concrete contractor is a professional who places, colors, finishes, repairs, and maintains concrete, whether for interior, exterior, residential, or commercial use. Many homeowners use contractors for projects like driveways, pools, and patios. 

Concrete is a durable, sustainable substance that can be colored, shaped, and stamped into almost any design. It's more energy efficient to produce and allows less heat and cold to escape than other materials. When working with a skilled contractor, homeowners can use concrete to significantly increase the value of their property.

Common Concrete Construction Projects

Driveways 
Concrete driveways are a popular choice because of their durability - they can last up to 30 years - and low maintenance requirements. A basic concrete driveway runs between $3 to $10 per square foot, while a customized or decorative driveway costs between $15 and $25 per square foot. While they're durable overall, concrete driveways are more susceptible to cracks, and harder to repair than asphalt or other alternatives. In addition, patch jobs and stains from gas and oil on concrete are more obvious.

Patching a concrete driveway costs between $6 and $10 per square foot, while resurfacing costs about $2.25 per square foot. Resurfacing is a nice middle ground between multiple patch jobs and a complete replacement. During the process, a contractor removes and replaces the top layer of concrete.

Patios
Concrete patios run anywhere from $6 to $17 per square foot, depending on customization and the intricacy of the design. Like driveways, they last for several years and require minimal maintenance, making them a nice alternative to wood. Homeowners don't have to deal with termites, splintering or wood rot. In addition, because concrete patios are a single, solid surface, there are no cracks through which weeds can grow. What's more, concrete patios can be made to fit any area, so owners don't have to worry about curves or hard corners. Many homeowners choose to stamp or stain their concrete patios to mimic brick or stone, getting the same look as these materials for a much cheaper price.

Pools
While concrete driveways and patios are cost efficient in the long term, concrete pools require frequent maintenance and expensive renovations. They need to be resurfaced and retiled every 10 to 20 years, which can set owners back $10,000 or more. In addition, it takes anywhere from two to four months to install a pool. That said, concrete pools are more flexible than any other option. Unlike fiberglass pools, they aren't built from a mold nor are they limited to shipping restrictions. In addition, concrete pools do not depreciate in value the way vinyl liner ones do.

Alternatively, concrete pool decks provide a safe, slip-resistant area that adds to the beauty and atmosphere of the pool area. They are faster and cheaper to install than other materials, costing about the same price per square foot as a concrete patio. When it comes to the coping, the material used to cap the edge of the pool, owners of a concrete deck can use stone, precast concrete or poured concrete. Stone is the most expensive option, while precast concrete is the cheapest and easiest to install. Poured concrete, meanwhile, provides the most even finish.

Basements
Concrete is the most popular material used to construct basements because of its versatility and moisture resistance. Additionally, poured concrete is resistant to fires and cave-ins. Masonry walls - where the walls are constructed with concrete blocks - have several joints that can undermine their structural integrity. These walls must be properly waterproofed to prevent seepage from soil outside. Homeowners can also choose precast panel basements, where the concrete walls are poured ahead of time and lifted into place with a crane. A single concrete wall costs about $5,000, most of which goes to labor.

Concrete Removal
Removing concrete costs about $1 to $3 per square foot, but there are several factors that push a demolition job into the thousands. The contractor might charge additional fees if the concrete is hard to access - for example, if it's surrounded by fences or large trees that block construction equipment. They might also charge extra for thicker concrete, complex installations, or if the homeowner wants to preserve part of the original design.

Specialty Projects

Countertops
Concrete countertops are custom designed and handcrafted by a designer or architect. Most of their cost comes from the design process itself, but the material runs between $65 and $135 per square foot. Installation costs approximately $40 to $50 per hour. Traditionally, concrete countertops are viewed on the same level as luxurious materials like marble and granite. They provide a seamless, long-lasting surface and can take any form or edge design, making them more customizable than other options.

Interior Floors
Costing between $10 and $20 per square foot, concrete floors add a modern, stylish element to interiors. They require minimal maintenance, are easy to clean, and resist scratches from pets. They're also odor resistant, so any spills or accidents won't leave long-lasting smells behind. Because concrete absorbs heat, the floors can even reduce heating bills. They're uncomfortable to stand on for long periods of time, however, and they can create an echo. While concrete floors last longer than carpet or laminate, areas with heavy traffic are known to develop hairline cracks.

Customizing Concrete

Stamped Concrete
Stamped concrete is textured to replicate other materials, such as stone, slate, brick, tile, and even wood. In fact, stamping is generally preferable to using these other materials because it provides the same look as stone and brick at a much cheaper cost. In addition, stamped concrete is more durable than other options, especially wood. Prices range between $8 and $18 per square foot. More realistic designs require multiple patterns and colors, increasing the cost.

Acid Stains
Acid-based stains mix a water-and-acid solution with inorganic metallic salts to create a chemical reaction that permanently alters the color of concrete. The result is a beautiful, marble-like look. Unlike tinted sealers or coatings, acid stains penetrate the concrete itself and leave no film behind. Although they provide the richest colors of any stain, they're limited to a handful of earth-toned options. Many manufacturers only offer acid stains in eight different colors. 

Non-Reactive Stains
Non-reactive stains offer unlimited color options but lack the depth of acid stains. These aren't exactly true stains - rather, they're coatings, dyes or sealers that sit on top of the concrete, filling the pores with pigment. These treatments are called non-reactive stains because they do not create a chemical reaction like acid stains.

Colored Concrete
Colored concrete is created by blending liquid, granular or powdered iron oxide pigments with natural concrete. These pigments are either mined directly from the earth or manufactured in a chemical plant. Iron oxide particles are about 10 times smaller than those of concrete. Therefore, when mixed together, the pigment masks some of the natural concrete color. Gray concrete is harder to color than white, so most manufacturers will only mix in dark pigments. White concrete accepts any color but is more expensive than gray.

Curing
Decorative, colored, stamped, and stained concrete must be cured to minimize efflorescence, a powdery, white substance that forms on concrete surfaces. This occurs as water in the concrete evaporates, carrying calcium hydroxide with it. When the calcium hydroxide mixes with the carbon dioxide in the air, it becomes calcium carbonate, which remains on top of the concrete. Efflorescence isn't visible on gray surfaces, nor is it damaging, but it ruins the look of color-treated designs. Wet curing is the best way to cure concrete and prevent efflorescence, but it's hard to do so evenly. As such, most people choose liquid curing compounds instead.

Concrete Hazards

Wet concrete can irritate the skin or cause first-, second-, or third-degree chemical burns. Cement dust contains silica, which damages the lungs and can lead to cancer or silicosis. Many concrete mixtures contain cement, so homeowners should be careful if contractors create the concrete on site. Anyone who touches wet concrete or dust should wash their skin with soap and cold water. 

Questions to Ask Before Hiring a Concrete Contractor

As with any home improvement project, it's best to shop around before hiring a professional. Homeowners should ask questions while vetting potential contractors to find one whose terms suit both need and budget.

  • Are you licensed? It's always best to choose a licensed concrete contractor, regardless of a state or city's licensing laws. A licensed contractor must pass exams that test his or her knowledge of concrete mixing, construction, and safety. Licensing requirements vary between locations. Some have financial restrictions - for example, contractors in California must have a license if they want to work on a job with a total cost of more than $500. Homeowners can search the website of their state or local government for a list of licensed professionals.
  • Are you insured? Generally, insurance covers damage to people or property during the construction process. It can, but doesn't always, cover the cost of a poor job. Get the specifics of a contractor's insurance policy before agreeing to construction.
  • Are you bonded? A bond covers the performance gaps in insurance, ensuring the contractor fulfills the terms of his or her contract. Bonding protects consumers from poor work and certain financial obligations, like obtaining supplies and permits.
  • What is your warranty? Ask for specific details about the warranties offered, including what types of damage and maintenance are covered and when. Some warranties contain complex or confusing clauses and don't cover common repairs such as pool resurfacing. Never work with a contractor who doesn't offer a warranty. 
  • How long will the job take? A detailed timeline will prevent any unexpected gaps in construction, weather permitting. Some contractors start a job, leave for a few days, and finish later.

Certification and National Associations

Homeowners should work with a concrete contractor who is either certified by or a member of one or more trade organizations for high-quality results. These individuals adhere to professional guidelines and are versed in industry and safety standards.

  • American Concrete Institute: The ACI offers more than 20 certification courses in specialized areas of the concrete industry, including adhesive anchor installation, strength testing, and quality management.
  • American Society of Concrete Contractors: The ASCC is a nonprofit made up of more than 600 member companies. It was created by and for concrete contractors to provide educational and networking opportunities, although it does not offer certification.
  • National Ready Mixed Concrete Association: The NRMCA offers certification programs related to sustainability, green construction, concrete delivery, and more. Formed in 1930, it is the leading advocate for ready-mixed concrete.
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