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Seven Fitness Trends for 2017

YP Editors

Happy New Year! Who's ready to burn off some holiday weight? And, more importantly, who's looking for new and ideally fun ways to tackle fitness in the near future? The 2017 trends are a mix of new and retro, tech-enabled and totally basic. You can splurge on a membership to a trendy new chain, or spend a couple of $20s on simple fitness accessories that stand the test of time.

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Mixed-Format/Interval Training classes

High intensity and specially designed to maximize results, these workouts are popular because they're not boring and they don't waste a single minute. Whether it's interval training, or one-minute bursts, or athlete-conditioning class, mixed format classes are super-popular with Type A personalities and anyone short on time but serious about fitness.

Available at Barry's Bootcamp, PXT conditioning at PureYoga, CRUNCH's Hardcore 360-3X.

Suspension

What if gravity was factored in an entirely different way? It would put less stress on the workhorse joints like your knees, while forcing different muscle groups into play. TRX and aerial yoga both are based on this precept. They offer totally different workouts—TRX originated with Navy Seals and utilizes sturdy resistance bands, while aerial yoga is more of a circus discipline. However, both get results and are gaining devotees every week. If water's your element, try acro-yoga.

Available at gyms nationwide. For aerial yoga, Lyra at CRUNCH.

 Wearable Tech in a Class or Studio Setting

The whole concept of an app that tracks and encourages your fitness is great, but most people don't find that an app can offer the same kind of motivation as a trainer shouting encouragement. Thus, places are popping up that offer both. New York City gyms began to sell wearable activity trackers in 2014, and there are now multiple apps specifically designed to track people's stationary bicycle workouts. Orange Theory called wearable tech "the cornerstone of everything we do" in a 2016 interview with Wareable.com

Dance Aerobics/Cardio

It's sort of a return to the awesome 1980s, but with much more eclectic music that runs the gamut from Latin, to sexy open-format, to 100% Beyonce. Dance fitness is many women's favorite discipline, and as such has never gone away, but the sub-categories are ever evolving.

Available at Bokwa, Kelly Ripa's current favorite, AKT in New York; or Equinox's Animal Flow.

Boxing on a Heavy Bag

While you won't learn good form or defense, boxing on the heavy bag has become hugely popular especially with girls who love to get out their stress and feel tough while getting toned. At popular cardio-boxing studios, not only will attendees tone their arms and thighs, they'll learn a bit about how to punch and kick. Great for self esteem boosts and mean-mugging post-workout selfies.

Available at LA Boxing and Title Boxing.

Portable + Inexpensive gear

Here's a blast from the schooldays past: jumpropes. Getting buzz in recent fitness features, along with resistance bands, small weights and yoga mats, they can travel anywhere and fit into all sorts of fitness regimens. From video workouts, to outdoor boot camps, to personal trainer sessions, inexpensive tools like the jump rope or hula hoop are versatile and indispensible. To be honest, if you have a jump rope and a timer, you really don't need a personal trainer at all.

Available at REI and Dick's Sporting Goods.

Drumming


Get out your aggression while slimming and trimming your biceps--and no, this year it's not with another cardio boxing routine. Drumming is the latest cardio-fusion craze to incorporate music and movement--and while some versions of it are literally air-drumming, this one has participants landing their sticks on exercise balls. It's no surprise that this super high-energy, pop music-based fitness curriculum became popular in school gyms before expanding to all-ages exercise facilities. It doesn't rely on complicated choreography, and encourages high-energy engagement and constant movement.  The routines work your core as much as your arms... and unlike when behind a real drum kit, your feet are moving all the time as well.

Available at Drum Fit.

 

 
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