Lubbock Martial Arts Instruction

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2. Tiger Martial Arts & Fitness

7006 University Ave # 15Lubbock, TX 79413

(806) 368-6009
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3. Lubbock Shaolin-Do

Lubbock, TX 79424

(806) 777-1312

From Business: Shaolin-Do Kung Fu and Tai Chi is offered by instructor Sifu Andy Van Arum a student of almost 11yrs under Master Joe Schaefer, Elder Master Bill Leonard and Grandm…

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4. Black Belt Universe

2126 19th StLubbock, TX 79401

(806) 368-3437
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5. Lubbock Karate

BBB Rating: A+

3517 50th StLubbock, TX 79413

(806) 792-2192
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6. Katsujin Ryu Budokai

4922 9th StLubbock, TX 79416

(806) 792-6520
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7. West Texas Karate

BBB Rating: A+

5020 50th St Unit 115Lubbock, TX 79414

(806) 370-0889
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8. Cheon's Tiger Martial Arts

8004 Indiana Avenue Suite B3Lubbock, TX 79423

(806) 752-1716
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9. BIG SKY TAEKWONDO

6104 66th St. #400Lubbock, TX 79424

(806) 781-1489
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10. Pittman's Martial Arts

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BBB Rating: A+

2233 34th StLubbock, TX 79411

(806) 749-3656

I was in Lubbock on work travel and was looking for an academy to train for just a day. Mr. Klay Pittman was accommodating to my specific needs. I…

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11. Sang Kim's Tae Kwon Do Inst

8206 Indiana AveLubbock, TX 79423

(806) 794-1500
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Bodyworks Family Sports Ctr

13. Bodyworks Family Sports Ctr

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5105 82nd StreetLubbock, TX 79424

(806) 687-8000

Good gym. Love the kids zone..

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14. Gilmore Method Eskrima

1102 Slide RoadLubbock, TX 79416

(806) 795-0981
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15. Texas Karate Institute

BBB Rating: A+

2878 34th StLubbock, TX 79410

(806) 792-8097
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16. Premier Martial Arts

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3517 50th StLubbock, TX 79413

(806) 792-2192

It is not worth the money you pay. It is all about the money. The owner is never out in classes. Once I walked in and he was watching a very inappro…

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Helpful Reviews 
The Pittman Jiu-Jitsu Academy
jsd2112 rated
Pittman's Jiu-Jitsu History

Also known as  BJJ, Jiu-Jitsu, Gracie Jiu-Jitsu, GJJ Focus  Grappling Country of origin  Brazil Brazil , Japan Japan Creator  Helio Gracie, Carlos Gracie, Mitsuyo Maeda. Famous practitioners  Gracie family, Machado family, Fabio Gurgel, Antônio Rodrigo Nogueira, Demian Maia, Marcelo Garcia, BJ Penn, Saulo Ribeiro, Joe Moreira, Alexandre Ribeiro, Fabricio Werdum, Fredson Paixão, Ronaldo "Jacare" Souza, Braulio Estima, Vinicius Magalhães (Draculino), Yuki Nakai, Robert Drysdale, Robson Moura, Ailson "Jucão" Brites Parenthood  Early 20th century Kodokan Judo[1] Olympic sport  No Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (Portuguese pronunciation: [dʒɪwˈdʒitsu], English: /dʒuːˈdʒɪtsuː/) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. The art was derived from the Japanese martial art of Kodokan judo in the early 20th century,[1][2] which was itself developed from a number of schools (or Ryu) of Japanese jujutsu in the 19th century. It teaches that a smaller, weaker person can successfully defend against a bigger, stronger assailant by using leverage and proper technique—most notably by applying joint-locks and chokeholds to defeat the other person. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu can be trained for sport grappling tournaments (gi and no-gi) and mixed martial arts (MMA) competition or self defense .[3] Sparring (commonly referred to as 'rolling') and live drilling play a major role in training, and a premium is placed on performance, especially in competition, in relation to progress and ascension through grades/belts. The art began with Mitsuyo Maeda (aka Conde Koma, or Count Coma in English), an expert Japanese judoka and member of the then-recently-founded Kodokan. Maeda was one of five of Judo's top groundwork experts that Judo's founder Kano Jigoro sent overseas to demonstrate and spread his art to the world. Maeda left Japan in 1904 and visited a number of countries[2] giving "jiu-do" demonstrations and accepting challenges from wrestlers, boxers, savate fighters and various other martial artists before eventually arriving in Brazil on November 14, 1914.[4] Jiu-jitsu is known as more than just a system of fighting. Since its inception in 1882, its parent art of judo was separated from older systems of Japanese jujutsu by an important difference that was passed on to BJJ: it is not solely a martial art: it is also a sport; a method for promoting physical fitness and building character in young people; and, ultimately, a way (Do) of life.[5][6] It is often claimed that BJJ is a development of traditional Japanese jujutsu, not judo, and that Maeda was a jujutsuka.[citation needed] However, Maeda never trained in jujutsu. He first trained in sumo as a teenager, and after the interest generated by stories about the success of judo at contests between judo and jujutsu that were occurring at the time, he changed from sumo to judo, becoming a student of Kano's Kodokan judo.[2] He was promoted to 7th dan in Kodokan judo the day before he died in 1941. In 1914, Maeda was given the opportunity to travel to Brazil as part of a large Japanese immigration colony. In Brazil, in the northern state of Para, he befriended Gastão Gracie, an influential businessman, who helped Maeda get established. To show his gratitude, Maeda offered to teach traditional Japanese Jiu-Jitsu to Gastão's oldest son, Carlos Gracie. Carlos learned for a few years and eventually passed his knowledge to his brothers. At age fourteen, Helio Gracie, the youngest of the brothers moved in with his older brothers who lived and taught Jiu-Jitsu in a house in Botafogo, a borough of Rio de Janeiro. Following doctor’s recommendations, Helio would spend the next few years limited to only watching his brothers teach as he was naturally frail.

The Pittman Jiu-Jitsu Academy
ds2112 rated
More Pittmans Jiu-Jitsu History

One day, when Helio Gracie was 16 years old, a student showed up for class when Carlos was not around. Helio, who had memorized all the techniques from watching his brothers teach, offered to start the class. When the class was over, Carlos showed up and apologized for his delay. The student asked for Helio to continue being his instructor, Helio Gracie then gradually developed Gracie Jiu Jitsu as an adaptation from Judo as he was unable to do many Judo moves.[7] Helio Gracie also held the rank of 6th dan in judo.[8] [edit] Name When Maeda left Japan, judo was still often referred to as "Kano Jiu-Jitsu",[9] or, even more generically, simply as "Jiu-Jitsu."[10][11] Higashi, the co-author of "Kano Jiu-Jitsu"[9] wrote in the foreword:    "Some confusion has arisen over the employment of the term 'jiudo'. To make the matter clear I will state that jiudo is the term selected by Professor Kano as describing his system more accurately than jiu-jitsu does. Professor Kano is one of the leading educators of Japan, and it is natural that he should cast about for the technical word that would most accurately describe his system. But the Japanese people generally still cling to the more popular nomenclature and call it jiu-jitsu."[9 Outside Japan, however, this distinction was noted even less. Thus, when Maeda and Satake arrived in Brazil in 1914, every newspaper announced "jiu-jitsu" despite both men being Kodokan judoka.[5] The Japanese government itself did not officially mandate until 1925 that the correct name for the martial art taught in the Japanese public schools should be "judo" rather than "jujutsu".[12] In Brazil, the art is still called "Jiu-Jitsu". When the Gracies went to the United States to spread their art, they used the terms "Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu" and "Gracie Jiu-Jitsu" to differentiate from the already present styles using similar-sounding names. "Jiu-jitsu" is an older romanization that was the original spelling of the art in the West, and it is still in common use, whereas the modern Hepburn romanization is "jūjutsu."

The Pittman Jiu-Jitsu Academy
robbiggers rated
Son of a TKD/Hapkido Grandmaster, and I train at Pittman's

I have trained in martial arts since I was 6 years old. I primarily trained in Tae-Kwon-Do and Hapkido. I am currently a second degree black belt in Tae-Kwon-Do, but I also cross trained in: Tangsudo, Karate, Kenpo, Judo, and Aikido. When I returned from the Army I returned to training at my father's academy where he primarily teaches Tae-Kwon-Do and Hapkido. I found that what he was teaching had little or no real world applicability (i.e., if I were to use the techniques he was teaching on the soldiers I trained with, I would end up being severely hurt.) I walked into a Burger King one day and filled out a card for 30 days of training. I was called by a member of Mr. Pittman's staff two days later. I went to an introductory lesson and was shocked by the academy, the staff, the training, and especially the professionalism. I completed the introductory lesson and my wife and I set down with an instructor to discuss my future with Pittman's Academy of Martial Arts. I signed up immediately! I have told Mr. Pittman repeatedly that I am only sorry that I didn't come to his academy sooner. I having been training under Mr. Pittman for two years and recently my younger brother joined the academy as well. My best friend in Dallas recently found a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu school in the Dallas area and began training because he saw the positive effects it has had on my life. As a law student I find that the ability to train full speed while minimizing the risk of injury is a fun way to get fit, relieve stress, and learn how to defend my self and my family if I ever encounter an unfortunate situation. As for the cleanliness, I asked Mr. Pittman why we don't have carpet and he explained that it was to ensure that the professional cleaning crew he has hired is able to clean the academy thoroughly. I have been at the academy when the professional cleaning crew, that comes every night, was there cleaning the mats and the floors; I assure you, I would not be training on a mat that was dirty or riddled with bacteria. Please do not be misled by the negative comments that others have left; come to Mr. Pittman's Academy and find for yourself that you will not find a better place in Lubbock for you and your family to train in martial arts.

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